Category Archives: Fiction

The Green Ember by Smith

Can you imagine rabbits and wolves with swords fighting? Unbelievable!

The Green Ember
by S. D. Smith
Story Warren Book
December 2014

This is the story of an entire army on the attack and a scared little rabbit becoming a hero. The author has a vivid imagination and I thoroughly enjoyed his book. Recommended very highly to all. I’m actually looking forward to reading more of their books about these little furry creatures that were amazing soldiers. Who would believe it?

From the publisher: Heather and Picket are extraordinary rabbits with ordinary lives until calamitous events overtake them, spilling them into a cauldron of misadventures. They discover that their own story is bound up in the tumult threatening to overwhelm the wider world.

Kings fall and kingdoms totter. Tyrants ascend and terrors threaten. Betrayal beckons, and loyalty is a broken road with peril around every bend.

Where will Heather and Picket land? How will they make their stand?


Mary Asher, the Golden Reviewer, is a founding book blogger for BookGateway.com and has generously provided this review. She describes herself as “an 88 year young great-grandmother and an avid reader.”

The Abolition of Man by Lewis

This very short collection of lectures is a fascinating look at a mid last century argument against, what I believe we now call, postmodernism.

The Abolition of Man
by C.S. Lewis
1943

Lewis argues most vigorously against the attack on reason that a couple authors of a school text make, knowingly or not. The idea that sets Lewis off is a seeming rejection of objective reality; that things are objectively true regardless of our opinions. He carefully makes his argument without referring to Christianity or any religion at all, but falls back on what he calls the Tao or – and Lewis readers will recognize this one – natural law.

This argument is a winning one, but unfortunately we see that nearly 80 years later society has embraced it. Postmodernism and relativism rule academia and culture. “My truth” and “your truth” are accepted even though they don’t exist, objectively. “That’s how you see it” or “That’s your opinion” have not only been shown to be as destructive as Lewis anticipated but lead to exactly where he warns us: the death, or abolition, of all objective knowledge.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

The Great Divorce by Lewis

I’ve read this classic before and revisiting this quick read is definitely worth it.

The Great Divorce
By C.S. Lewis
1945

For those that don’t know, the whole story is a dream that the main character has of waking up in Hell in a line for a bus that is taking a trip to Heaven. In Heaven we observe several miserable visitors as they are wooed and pleaded with to join citizens of Heaven (that they knew in life).

The story is very reminiscent of Lewis’ Screwtape Letters in that we aren’t supposed to take this as a true theology of Heaven and Hell, but instead we are to see the character and decisions we make in choosing Hell over Heaven. While Screwtape takes the point of view of a tempter of vice, this book takes the point of view of the sinner choosing vice. So long as we see this book from that perspective and not an attempt at theology of Heaven – or an attempt to paint Lewis as a Universalist – this is a great book.

Insightful as always and cutting for those of us who still struggle to choose Joy instead of Self. With the reminder ever so often.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

Will Save Galaxy for Food by Croshaw

Imagine that you’re a starship pilot on the fringes of space (the black), saving whole planners of people in the golden age of space exploration. You’re a hero to humans everyone; beloved to all. Then humanity invents a way to get from any two points in space instantaneously. And you don’t have a job anymore. And now you’re scraping by, begging for jobs to fly tourists on quick planetary flybys. It’s a big step down.

Will Save Galaxy for Food
by Yahtzee Croshaw
Dark Horse Books
February 2017

Our hero takes a job pretending to be a different pilot – an incredibly hated one – for a mobster to take his son on an adventure. The boy, and his girlfriend, who happens to be the daughter of the President of Earth, want to go do into space. In an act of fear, our hero and the monsters former secretary decide they would rather kidnap the kids as a plan to escape the clutches of the mobster. It gets more convoluted. The good news is that almost none of it matters as this is incredibly shallow and no details are necessary to enjoy this quick and simple read. It’s supposed to be a satire, and while it is funny at times, this is no Discworld novel.

Complete pass time and nothing more.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

Attack on Titan 1

Attack on Titan is an incredibly odd story, even for a manga or anime, which is where I first was introduced to this world. Humanity live in huge walled cities and outside the walls are giant steam monsters that look like naked humans and that eat humans if available. No one knows where they came from or what their goal is. Survival is the focus.

Attack on Titan 1
By Hajime Isayama
Kodansha Comics
June 2012

In manga 1, we meet Erin, the overly angry teenage protagonist and his friends, the smart thinker friend and the powerful warrior friend and the inexplicable enemies. Anime tropes = achieved. If there isn’t something introduced to make this story stand out quickly it’s easy to see how some readers would lose interest. (Like I did when I got so freaking bored watching Erin take his lessons on the anime – I wasted adventure; not high school drama.) Fortunately, things do get a little better as [Spoiler Alert] Erin gets eaten at the end of manga 1.

I’ve already queued up manga 2 and intend to finish all 22 prior to watching the live action Japanese movies (2014) with my daughter, who loves this story.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

IQ by Ide

This detective novel won several awards: Shamus (Best First PI Novel 2017,) Anthony (Best First Novel 2017,) Macavity (Best First Mystery 2017,) and nominated for the Edgar Award. Along with the accolades, this is billed as a 20 year old black Sherlock Holmes solving cases in South Central LA. So I was sold on giving it a try.

IQ
By Joe Ide
Mullholland
October 2016

The main mystery – a rapper has been targeted by a hit man – isn’t really the main story here. Since this is the first novel, Ide weaves in IQ’s past as the more important of the two stories. He jumps back and forth between 2005 and 2013 and it flows well. By the end, we have s solution for the rapper mystery as well as a cheat understanding of IQ and his gangsta friend/ Watson.

While I enjoyed the book, I found getting to know Isaiah much for interesting than finding the person who took out the hit on the rapper. And I find that solution to be tagged on to the end of a book that maybe didn’t need that whole plotline. The ending felt hurried and unsatisfying. There is a second book and I’ll definitely read it, so this wasn’t a deal breaker for me.

For those that this matters to, it is important to note that this book is filled to overflowing with crass language, cussing, gang violence, sexuality and whatever else would automatically trigger an R rating if filmed.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

I Am Legend by Mattheson

It’s (dissapointingly) normal to say a movie doesn’t follow a book well, but I was surprised by just how far BOTH movies strayed from the source material of this book.

I Am Legend
by Richard Matheson
1954

Here you find a thoughtful, plodding, psychological story of one man, maybe the last man alive on earth, and how he deals with the loss of everything and everyone he knows to a great plague that may be vampirism and the great loneliness he feels.

It’s not a great book, and definitely dated, but it was worth the read and definitely better than either movie. Dark and unrelenting and interesting.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

Kobane Calling by Zerocalcare

A graphic art non-fiction account of the artists visit to Northern Syria / Rojava (Kurds) and first hand account of his impressions on the factions currently at war.

Kobane Calling
by zerocalcare
Lion Forge
October 2017

I don’t accept the stories as gospel, because there is simply too much confusion and propaganda on all sides. But I do accept these stories as his experiences and will continue to dig deeper into this crazy abyss that currently has so many nations in a sort of proxy war over this area. It was fascinating and, if true, heartbreaking. Definitely worth taking a look at.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

Year One by Roberts

A strange interesting post apocalyptic novel where a devastating virus kills a massive amount of people in the world and at the same time magic awakens in the world. I’m looking forward to the next novel.

Year One
By Nora Roberts
St. Martin’s Press
December 2017

FYI: NSFW at times, with strong language and a couple of brief accounts of sexuality. Very brutal at times. Lots of apocalyptic violence.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

The Night Bird by Freeman

This is a story of a psychiatrist who erases the memory of what a person is most afraid of. Several of her patients are committing suicide for no reason. What is happening?

The Night Bird
Frost Easton Mystery Book 1
By Brian Freeman
Thomas & Mercer
February 2017

Is someone trying to destroy the doctor? Could it be one of her patients doing this? The book was a page turner. I thoroughly enjoyed it!

From the publisher: What if you had to relive your most terrifying memory…over and over? A detective and a psychiatrist investigate in Thriller Award–winning author Brian Freeman’s gripping psychological novel.

Homicide detective Frost Easton doesn’t like coincidences. When a series of bizarre deaths rock San Francisco—as seemingly random women suffer violent psychotic breaks—Frost looks for a connection that leads him to psychiatrist Francesca Stein. Frankie’s controversial therapy helps people erase their most terrifying memories…and all the victims were her patients.

As Frost and Frankie carry out their own investigations, the case becomes increasingly personal—and dangerous. Long-submerged secrets surface as someone called the Night Bird taunts the pair with cryptic messages pertaining to the deaths. Soon Frankie is forced to confront strange gaps in her own memory, and Frost faces a killer who knows the detective’s worst fears.

As the body count rises and the Night Bird circles ever closer, a dedicated cop and a brilliant doctor race to solve the puzzle before a cunning killer claims another victim.


Mary Asher, the Golden Reviewer, is a founding book blogger for BookGateway.com and has generously provided this review. She describes herself as “an 86 year young great-grandmother and an avid reader.”