Category Archives: Classic

Fiction from long established or historically relevant novelists. Includes classical literature (Greek and Roman, Elizabethian, American, European). Novels written 50+ years ago.

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Twain

I haven’t read many Twain books. In fact, this may be the first time I’ve read one all the way through. And I have to admit that it wasn’t easy to get through. The beginning was interesting enough, but the loooooong middle section was so uneventful that even Twain jumps forward a few years at one point.

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court
by Mark Twain
1889

I was struck by the fact that this book wouldn’t work with today’s audience for another reason as well: he just knows too much about things that we don’t. For instance, he creates a telegraph and phone line system, wires for power, creates factories and schools, manufactures bicycles and other tools. How many of us today know how to do any of those things? We get stuck with King Arthur’s court and we, what? Argue about political correctness on a Twitter made from stone carvings (there isn’t a printing press, no one can read, and paper as we know it doesn’t exist.) We’d be killed. I mean the guy knew the date of the eclipse from that year hundreds of years before his time. I don’t even remember the exact date of the one that happened here last August. Was it August?

The story ends in an unexpected and stunted way. I had to go back to the end and the beginning to make it all make sense. It’s not that it’s bad, but it’s just so abrupt. And sad.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

Fahrenheit 451 by Bradbury

Imagine a world where there is so much information coming at you that you just can’t handle it; you decide that it would be better to simply avoid information that doesn’t make you happy. The world in this book is that world. And so is the real world, or at least it seems plausible that we are heading there.

Fahrenheit 451
by Ray Bradbury
1953

In recent years we have seen a louder and louder call to silence critics or people we don’t agree with. From de-platforming on college campuses, to blocking and banning on social platforms, to campaigns to fire people from their jobs for things they have said outside of work, to trying to get books banned, to making speech illegal if we find it hateful, we are definitely on the road to more censorship, rather than less. Bradbury provides this world for us: a world of happy thoughts (or else) and complete control by a police state that regulates not only how we relate to others but entertainment and learning as well.

Bradbury was ahead of his time in more than just the call to be wary of totalitarianism. His ideas of wall sized screens (instead of TVs) and interacting with those actors directly was prescient. The idea that we would, as a society, choose to burn ideas (books) on our own, that we would self-medicate (ala Brave New World) and that only true freedom would be outside the system all stay with the reader long after the book is over. I’ve read this book before and, while the story isn’t great, the points the author makes are true and definitely worth being reminded of.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

Up From Slavery by Washington

Booker was born a slave on a plantation in Alabama. He died the president of a university and one of the most celebrated men in America.

Up From Slavery
by Booker T. Washington
1901

This is a fascinating autobiography by an important fight in American history! The first few chapters, especially, give a history of the end of slavery and the first 25 years after emancipation from the perspective of a former slave that are indispensable! Later chapters focus more on Washington’s accolades and the growth of Tuskegee University and aren’t as interesting, except for certain events.

This is a book worth reading and one all Americans should read for the history and also Washington’s attitude and philosophy, which I think still matters: educate yourself, gain skills, work hard. Rise up.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

The Abolition of Man by Lewis

This very short collection of lectures is a fascinating look at a mid last century argument against, what I believe we now call, postmodernism.

The Abolition of Man
by C.S. Lewis
1943

Lewis argues most vigorously against the attack on reason that a couple authors of a school text make, knowingly or not. The idea that sets Lewis off is a seeming rejection of objective reality; that things are objectively true regardless of our opinions. He carefully makes his argument without referring to Christianity or any religion at all, but falls back on what he calls the Tao or – and Lewis readers will recognize this one – natural law.

This argument is a winning one, but unfortunately we see that nearly 80 years later society has embraced it. Postmodernism and relativism rule academia and culture. “My truth” and “your truth” are accepted even though they don’t exist, objectively. “That’s how you see it” or “That’s your opinion” have not only been shown to be as destructive as Lewis anticipated but lead to exactly where he warns us: the death, or abolition, of all objective knowledge.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

The Great Divorce by Lewis

I’ve read this classic before and revisiting this quick read is definitely worth it.

The Great Divorce
By C.S. Lewis
1945

For those that don’t know, the whole story is a dream that the main character has of waking up in Hell in a line for a bus that is taking a trip to Heaven. In Heaven we observe several miserable visitors as they are wooed and pleaded with to join citizens of Heaven (that they knew in life).

The story is very reminiscent of Lewis’ Screwtape Letters in that we aren’t supposed to take this as a true theology of Heaven and Hell, but instead we are to see the character and decisions we make in choosing Hell over Heaven. While Screwtape takes the point of view of a tempter of vice, this book takes the point of view of the sinner choosing vice. So long as we see this book from that perspective and not an attempt at theology of Heaven – or an attempt to paint Lewis as a Universalist – this is a great book.

Insightful as always and cutting for those of us who still struggle to choose Joy instead of Self. With the reminder ever so often.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

I Am Legend by Mattheson

It’s (dissapointingly) normal to say a movie doesn’t follow a book well, but I was surprised by just how far BOTH movies strayed from the source material of this book.

I Am Legend
by Richard Matheson
1954

Here you find a thoughtful, plodding, psychological story of one man, maybe the last man alive on earth, and how he deals with the loss of everything and everyone he knows to a great plague that may be vampirism and the great loneliness he feels.

It’s not a great book, and definitely dated, but it was worth the read and definitely better than either movie. Dark and unrelenting and interesting.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

William Shakespeare’s Star Wars by Doescher

Star Wars and Shakespeare fans rejoice! Unto you is given the most amazing book. Ever.

William Shakespeare’s Star Wars
Verily, A New Hope
Ian Doescher
Quirk Books
July 2013

Imagine the whole story of Star Wars: A New Hope as a classical Shakespearian play. Having trouble? Me too. Then I picked up the book and chose a page at random and started reading. Brilliant! Here, let me help from page 101:

LUKE ‘Tis fortunate thou hast these storgae bins.
HAN Their use hath ever been for smuggling goods.
Ne’er have I thought I would myself herein
Be smuggling. All we do is madness-fie!
If I could start the ship, the tractor beam
Would wrap its eagle’s talons ’round my neck.
OBI-WAN The tractor beam thou may’st leave unto me.
Han Thou fool, I knew thou wouldst say as much.
OBI-WAN Aye, say thou a fool? Then fool, good Sir, am I.

Yeah, it’s awesome like that. Every page is awesome like that!

The actions and language are only part of the story, though; as Doescher adds asides (even for Droids) and chorus to move the story forward and give insight that a casual watcher of the movie may miss. It is very well done.

I can’t recommend this book high enough. It is perhaps my favorite book of the year, and possibly of several years.


Scott Asher is the Managing Editor of BookGateway.com. His personal blog is AshertopiA – a land flowing with milk and honey… and a lot of sticky people where he turns real life into stupid cartoons, writes on Christianity, Zombies, and whatever else he wants and posts Bible studies from his classes at church.

This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.

Tempestuous by Askew and Helmes

Popularity is conditional. We’ve all seen them fall. Miranda Prospero, is one of those fallen.

Tempestuous
A Twisted Lit Novel
By Kim Askew and Amy Helmes
Merit Press
January 2013

After her social life’s tragic demise, former “IT” girl Miranda is left working the “Hot Dog Cabob” with her new dweeby coworker: Ariel. During yet another awful shift at the food court of the local mall, a ginormuous snow storm sweeps in, trapping everyone in the mall overnight. To make matters even better, they’re trapped in with a thief who has broken in though the computer store! Miranda is left with a quiet and sarcastic loner named Caleb all night- literally. The two are handcuffed together. Again making things worse: the “IT” crowd, that used to practically worship Miranda, is locked in with them. This is going to be a loongg night…

I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and had a great time romping around the mall with these unforgettable characters. One thing parents may be concerned about are the usage of curse words. For instance, the “s-word” frequently and an example “her hellish s___s” are used in the book. Other than that the book is wonderful.

Unlike in Exposure, another twisted lit novel (see my review of it here) I have not read the Shakespeare play that this novel is based off of. I plan on reading The Tempest soon though, so that I can find all the little allusions and similarities that are sure to be there, like they were in Exposure.

I would recommend this book to middle schoolers and up to read, based on individual maturity and parent’s discretion. This book was wonderful to read and I hope to be seeing many more twisted Lit novels published In the future.


Arieltopia, Young Adult Editor, is an 12 year old avid reader – usually going through a book a day – who gives readers a unique perspective on Young Adult, Teen Fiction, along with adult fiction: an actual teenager’s perspective.

This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.

Exposure by Askew and Helmes

Skye Kingston, a shy girl who hides behind her camera more often than not, is a typical teen novel protagonist. She’s gorgeous, but doesn’t know it. She’s terrified by the high school “royalty”, and even has the common crush on the hot, jock, Craig. Everything seems like the happy, mundane usual high school life for Skye, until a boy named Duncan dies at a party.

Exposure
A Twisted Lit Novel
By Kim Askew and Amy Helmes
Merit Press
January 2013

During a game of flashlight tag in the woods, he goes missing, and the police find his body the next day- with signs of foul play. After Skye overhears a suspicious conversation between Beth, Craig’s crazy girlfriend, and Craig, her whole world is turned upside down.

This book is a modern retake on Shakespeare’s play, Macbeth. As one of the few youth who have read Macbeth, I found this book hilarious. Small hints and allusions to Macbeth made this heart-stopping mystery even more enjoyable. Such cleverly placed similarities include: Craig Mackenzie, called “Mac” by his team mates, to Macbeth himself. There are obviously many others, but part of the fun of reading this book is finding the allusions and comparisons. This book does include cussing. EX: the “S-word” appears very frequently (at least once per chapter, and that’s being conservative). Taking that into mind I’d recommend this book to teens, depending on maturity levels of the individual, maybe sophomores and up for most parents. However, considering g the fact that worse conduct in books has been discussed and read by my peers, 8th grade or 7th grade may be more feasible. Again, parent’s discretion.

I also would highly recommend reading Shakespeare’s Macbeth before reading this so you can find those hidden laughs throughout the story. If it seems too “old timey” or “lame” then read this first, and then the play. You’ll want to after you read Exposure.


Arieltopia, Young Adult Editor, is an 12 year old avid reader – usually going through a book a day – who gives readers a unique perspective on Young Adult, Teen Fiction, along with adult fiction: an actual teenager’s perspective.

This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.

The Ebb-Tide by Stevenson & Osborne

As a reviewer I find that most of my reading time is spent on upcoming or recently published books. While new books hold the promise of undiscovered greatness, there are multuitudes of already published books that I miss out on. So from time to time I’ll read a published book and when I do I like to read (or listen via Librivox) classic books by well known authors. One of my favorite classical authors is Robert Louis Stevenson (see my review of Kidnapped.) One of my favorite Librivox readers is Mark F. Smith. So when I saw a Stevenson book read by Smith I had to read it.

The Ebb-Tide
A Trio and a Quartette
by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne
1894

As the story starts, we find Herrick, a failed English businessman, Davis, a disgraced American sea captain, and Huish, a dishonest Englishman, in the port of Papeete on Tahiti begging on the beach. At their limits and considering suicide, a smallpox ridden ship comes to port giving them new hope – and new employment. Being the degenerates that they seem to be, they decide that they can join the ship, filling the vacancies of Captain and First Mate left by their deaths, then steal the cargo and retire richly on another island.

As they set off on their deception (by consuming some of the champaign they are supposed to be either delivering to Sydney or stealing) they soon find that they aren’t the only ones who have deceit in their hearts – it turns out that the ship’s cargo isn’t what it was supposed to be and they soon find themselves on the way to Peru but without enough food to make it. To further complicate matters, Herrick finds that Huish and Davis are not living up to their agreement and instead drinking themselves stupid every day leaving only the crew to pilot the ship.

When they come upon land, just in time, they make for it only to find that it, too has been hit by smallpox but isn’t yet deserted. Attwater, a bear of a man with a certain form of militant Christianity soons affects the group in ways that they never foresaw.

Like many Stevenson books, this one is a morality tale (and a call to Christianity) where the three villians find their lifestyles leading very clearly to a moralistic end. Evil begets death. Moral shallowness begets remorse. Choosing Christ equates to redemption. While I agree with Stevenson’s message I found the ending clunky and too tidy.

Herrick’s atheism and Attwater’s Christianity offer the most interesting sections of the final act. Attwater is a fascinating character who at once calls the villians to repentance and preaches on forgiveness that is only found with Jesus and then is also so severe as to ultimately push Herrick away. How those two discuss faith and belief makes the final act worth reading.

An interesting read that starts with a great premise that soon finds itself adrift that ends too abruptly. The Ebb-Tide lacks the grandness and adventure of other Stevenson books, but is still an interesting look into the culture of 150 years ago.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com. His personal blog is AshertopiA – a land flowing with milk and honey… and a lot of sticky people where he turns real life into stupid cartoons, writes on Christianity, Zombies, and whatever else he wants and posts Bible studies from his classes at church.

This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.