Category Archives: Fiction

Salvage by Scudiere

CJ and Walter Reed have been recruited by the Special Agent in charge of the elite Nightshade Group to become agents. The only drawback is that they must both pass the training at Quantico as partners.

Salvage
The Shadow Files #5
by A.J. Scudiere
Griffyn Ink
July 2018

Training begins and some how they manage to exist without killing each other. Walter is an ex-marine and CJ is a scientist. CJ’s grandfather is a well respected scientist. His personal lab has always intrigued CJ because of the weird bones he worked on. One secret trip to the lab revealed a body of a member of the Nightshade Group. What had her grandfather done and why is the body in his lab?

Now the trial under fire begins. CJ and Walter are pulled out of training and sent to a small town in the Ozarks. Some group of rebels are killing people in that area. They are on their own without the help of a seasoned agent. They are literally fighting for their lives.

As the evidence starts to pile up, it becomes clear that a person very close to CJ is responsible. Will she be able to do her job and bring the guilty person to justice?

As always, I thoroughly enjoyed the book. It is definitely a page-turner. Highly recommend it.

This is the fifth book in the Nightshade Series. I recommend you read all five. AJ is an excellent writer and keep readers in suspense from page one to the end. One book and you will be a fan for live. Can’t wait for AJ’s next book to come out.


Mary Asher, the Golden Reviewer, is a founding book blogger for BookGateway.com and has generously provided this review. She describes herself as “an 88 year young great-grandmother and an avid reader.”

This book was provided by the publisher for review.

Salvage Trouble by Morin

From the publisher: Carl Ramsey has a starship to run. Down on his luck, struggling to pay the cost of fuel, he’s just looking for some quick, easy cash. While looting the wreck of a passenger ship, they discover that one escape pod never ejected, and the passengers are still alive. A routine salvage job turns into a rescue mission, and a good deed never goes unpunished. With two refugees aboard, Captain Carl Ramsey finds that his ship, the Mobius, has a target painted on its hull. Someone is after the new passengers, and willing to stop at nothing to get them back.

Salvage Trouble
Black Ocean #1
by J. S. Morin
Magical Scrivener Press
October 2015

My take: Interestingly, Morin calls his books, “episodes” which makes a ton of sense because each story, really novella at about 150 pages or so, are very much like what you’d expect to see on TV, especially the golden age of SyFy’s in-house shows like Lexx, Dark Matter, and Farscape. Add magic to science fiction space ship based television and this is what you’d get. And it’s not bad, but it’s also not deep.

In this story, we meet the crew, especially Captain Ramsey, as they attempt to salvage a ship that had been attacked. They thought it was empty, but it turns out that there was one escape pod left on the ship with a Barbie doll-like priestess and a teenager who may not be who he seems to be. Turns out the priestess kidnapped the teen to save him and to shed light on the genetic experiments going on at their school. The normal obstacles come up – the galactic authorities board them, hirelings attack them, and so on – until an all too quick resolution involving magic, subterfuge and quick talking by the Captain. I said “of course” in my mind so many times during that sentence. This isn’t epic, or dark, or hard science fiction. But it’s fun. So I’ll keep reading the series and see if it develops more.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Twain

I haven’t read many Twain books. In fact, this may be the first time I’ve read one all the way through. And I have to admit that it wasn’t easy to get through. The beginning was interesting enough, but the loooooong middle section was so uneventful that even Twain jumps forward a few years at one point.

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court
by Mark Twain
1889

I was struck by the fact that this book wouldn’t work with today’s audience for another reason as well: he just knows too much about things that we don’t. For instance, he creates a telegraph and phone line system, wires for power, creates factories and schools, manufactures bicycles and other tools. How many of us today know how to do any of those things? We get stuck with King Arthur’s court and we, what? Argue about political correctness on a Twitter made from stone carvings (there isn’t a printing press, no one can read, and paper as we know it doesn’t exist.) We’d be killed. I mean the guy knew the date of the eclipse from that year hundreds of years before his time. I don’t even remember the exact date of the one that happened here last August. Was it August?

The story ends in an unexpected and stunted way. I had to go back to the end and the beginning to make it all make sense. It’s not that it’s bad, but it’s just so abrupt. And sad.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

A Trap for the Potentate by Atamanov

This is book 3 in the Dark Herbalist series with Amra, the goblin herbalist, and his plotline testers. Continuing after book 2, Amra has turned his sights to defeating the challenging quest to go to the end of the river Styx – a challenge that no group of players have yet won. Along the way, several plotholes open up very wide as Tim has to deal with real world enemies as a local gang takes out a hit on him and he loses his girlfriend early in the book when she completely disappears from the story. The ending – and so far there isn’t a fourth book, but it can’t possibly be done – is far too quick and leaves a lot to be desired.

A Trap for the Potentate
Dark Herbalist #3
by Michael Atamanov
Magic Dome Books
January 2018

Now that I’ve read three LitRPG books, all from Michael Atamanov, I’ve decided on two important conclusions: First, I really don’t think Atamanov is doing a good job writing a story. It’s completely possible that the fourth book will solve many of the outstanding issues, including, importantly, why Amra wins at everything. But I’m not sure that’s the case. He writes women like caricatures of Instagram models. They are there to be beautiful (every woman is) and interested in him (every woman is), while whining and complaining (every woman does) the whole time. There isn’t a three dimensional character in the book. Maybe his AI online girlfriend, Tiesha. Maybe.

Second, I like LitRPG and am totally feeling the itch to play RPGs. I’ve started another author’s LitRPG and am looking for others. There has to be a good LitRPG author and story. I’m a huge fan of Sword Art Online (season 1, especially), so I know this is possible.

If there is a fourth book, I’ll read it just to see if things wrap up. But I have low expectations right now.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

Stay on the Wing by Atamanov

This is book 2 in the Dark Herbalist series with Amra, the goblin herbalist, and his plotline testers. This story picks up right where the first one ends with Tim (Amra’s player’s real name), his sister, his girlfriend and friends playing an online VR MMORPG.

Stay on the Wing
Dark Herbalist #2
by Michael Atamanov
Magic Dome Books
June 2017

In part two, other players who watch Amra’s video stream become upset that Amra, a small, weak new player, somehow gets a unique flying mount in the game so the game company decides to put the mount up for grabs to any player who can hunt and kill Amra. The majority of the book is the story of Amra running from the other players, including a large portion of the book where Amra becomes a pirate captain with an orc army. Like the first book, Amra continues his long trek towards awesomeness as just about everything works out for him.

The first book in this series was my first experience in LitRPG or GameLit a sub genere that tells a story through the perspective of a game player – usually a VR player in the near future. Books like Ready Player One or other books with VR as an integral plot device aren’t the same thing as LitRPG. The focus on LitRPG novels is the game playing and RPG leveling aspects. In fact, in this series, the plotline tester aspect of the books was all about the company showing people that playing a goblin herbalist was fun and worthy of their time. The story is constantly interrupted with skill updates, character leveling, experience, game notifications, and other aspects of RPG gaming that gamers know and appreciate. I’m not sure other readers will understand as well or appreciate things. The biggest thing that non-gamers need to know if that the vast majority of how this “game” goes is wrong. No one wins as much as Amra does. Nothing goes wrong for him. Nothing. Even when he makes a mistake the game somehow adapts what he did and makes it a win for him. Real games as grind, loss, playing, fun, loss, grind and loss.

I bought books 2 and 3 at the same time. Otherwise, I’d likely not finish these fun but vapid stories.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

The Hawaiian Discovery by Brunstett and Brunstetter

Ellen Lambright is a young Amish girl working in a Bed & Breakfast owned by her friend Mandy and husband Ken. Ellen loves her work and has dreams of someday owning her own B&B.

The Hawaiian Discovery
by Wanda E. Brunstett & Jean Brunstetter
Shiloh Run Press
June 2018

Everything is going great until Ken’s father, who owns a chicken business in Hawaii, becomes seriously ill and they travel to Hawaii to help his mother. Unfortunately his father passes away and they are forced to stay in Hawaii.

Things are rough, but they are coping. Ken goes surfing with his friends and is attack by a shark, leaving him seriously injured, close to death. In order to pay his hospital bills, they are forced to sell the B&B, leaving Ellen without a job.

Ellen feels she must help her friend Mandy so she goes to Hawaii. Mandy has hired a young man, Rob Smith, to help Ellen take care of the business while Ken is healing. Soon they become friends, but Ellen is certain he is hiding something, he is so secretive. Ellen begins to have feeling for Rob, but knows this can’t happen because he isn’t Amish.

By accident Ellen over hears a telephone conversation between Rob and a member of his family. He was speaking in Pennsylvania Dutch. Why is he denying he is Amish? Ellen is very disappointed and feels now is the time to return home.

Rob, whose real name is Rueben Zook, comes to Indiana to visit Ellen. Will her dreams of marriage and owning a B&B become a reality or remain just a dream?

I really enjoyed the book and recommend it to readers of all age.


Mary Asher, the Golden Reviewer, is a founding book blogger for BookGateway.com and has generously provided this review. She describes herself as “an 88 year young great-grandmother and an avid reader.”

This book was provided by the publisher for review.

Fahrenheit 451 by Bradbury

Imagine a world where there is so much information coming at you that you just can’t handle it; you decide that it would be better to simply avoid information that doesn’t make you happy. The world in this book is that world. And so is the real world, or at least it seems plausible that we are heading there.

Fahrenheit 451
by Ray Bradbury
1953

In recent years we have seen a louder and louder call to silence critics or people we don’t agree with. From de-platforming on college campuses, to blocking and banning on social platforms, to campaigns to fire people from their jobs for things they have said outside of work, to trying to get books banned, to making speech illegal if we find it hateful, we are definitely on the road to more censorship, rather than less. Bradbury provides this world for us: a world of happy thoughts (or else) and complete control by a police state that regulates not only how we relate to others but entertainment and learning as well.

Bradbury was ahead of his time in more than just the call to be wary of totalitarianism. His ideas of wall sized screens (instead of TVs) and interacting with those actors directly was prescient. The idea that we would, as a society, choose to burn ideas (books) on our own, that we would self-medicate (ala Brave New World) and that only true freedom would be outside the system all stay with the reader long after the book is over. I’ve read this book before and, while the story isn’t great, the points the author makes are true and definitely worth being reminded of.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

The Utterly Uninteresting and Unadventurous Tales of Fred, the Vampire Accountant by Hayes

The book’s title is, unfortunately, accurate.

The Utterly Uninteresting and Unadventurous Tales of Fred, the Vampire Accountant
by Drew Hayes
REUTS Publications, LLC
July 2014

The book is a collection of stories that introduce the characters, one by one, and show some adventures that work out because they do. I almost didn’t finish the book. I set it aside and didn’t come back to it while I read several others. I did finish it and when I was done I couldn’t see myself reading more of this. But there are three books in the series. Three utterly uninteresting and unadventurous books.


Scott Asher is the Editor-in-Chief of BookGateway.com and a believer, a husband, a dad, a geek, an artist, a gamer, a teacher, a learner and tired.

You’re Gonna Love Me by Hatcher

Samantha Winters and Nick Chastain had been dating for several months. Nick is a brilliant professor at Organ State University and an adrenaline junkie. Samantha liked everything organized and safe. She is afraid of everything. She witnessed her father being killed in a skiing accident.

You’re Gonna Love Me
by Robin Lee Hatcher
Thomas Nelson
December 2017

When Samantha learned that Nick planned to go on a kayaking trip to Colorado on his spring break, this was all she could take. Harsh words were spoken, and Nick walked out. This ending their relationship. Samantha tried to apologize by email to Nick but he didn’t answer.

Two years later Samantha moves to Thunder Creek, Idaho to care for her grandmother who had been thrown by a horse and broken her ankle. Later, at the hospital, Nick comes to visit her grandmother. Samantha was speechless. How did Nick know her grandmother, why was he in Idaho, and why wasn’t he teaching at the University?

Over the course of weeks Samantha and Nick become friends. She learns the planned trip that had destroyed their relationship had almost ended Nick’s life. He can no longer teach and has opted for a quiet life in Idaho.

Will Samantha let go of her fears, trust that Nick is a change man, and will she and Nick recapture the love they once knew?

I highly recommend the book to readers of all age. A well written, entertaining book. I am sure you will enjoy it as much as I did.


Mary Asher, the Golden Reviewer, is a founding book blogger for BookGateway.com and has generously provided this review. She describes herself as “an 88 year young great-grandmother and an avid reader.”

This book was provided by the publisher for review.

Love Letter by Hauck

Chloe Daschle had a sneak peek at a script written by Jesse Gates about a love letter, written during the Revolutionary War, by Jesse’s 6x great-grandfather Hamilton Longfellow to Esther Kingsley. Chloe was successful in being cast as Esther and thus the journey began. The chemistry between Jesse and Chloe is highly charged.

Love Letter
by Rachel Hauck
Thomas Nelson
June 2018

Sir Michel is a very strong supporter of the English King and a Tory. He disapproves of Esther’s love for Hamilton, but she is determined to marry him.

At the battle of Cowpens, South Carolina, Hamilton is seriously wounded and almost lost his life. This battle turned the tide for the American Colonies that ended the war. Esther visits Hamilton in the hospital, but he rejects her. He will not left her be tied to a cripple. Hamilton soon realizes his mistake and writes the famous love letter to Esther, but Esther doesn’t receive it. She has returned to England.

The Daschles has come in possession of the famous love letter written to Esther from Hamilton. Could Esther Longfellow Hobart be Chloe’s 6x great -grandmother? The same Esther that loved Jesse’s 6x great-grandfather.

This is a well written story of love and courage during a difficult time. Just maybe generations later true come can unite two people deserving the love that Esther and Hamilton shared.

Highly recommended.


Mary Asher, the Golden Reviewer, is a founding book blogger for BookGateway.com and has generously provided this review. She describes herself as “an 88 year young great-grandmother and an avid reader.”

This book was provided by the publisher for review.