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The Long Way Home by Andrew Klavan

Andrew Klavan writes The Long Way Home in the first person serving to bring home the personal turmoil that the main character lives with. Charlie West, a 17 year old high schooler, who previously lived in a small town with his parents and sister, is on the run. He went to bed one night and woke up one year later accused of murdering his friend Alex and being a terrorist in an organization called “The Highlanders”.

Charlie was found guilty of murder and sentenced to prison. With the help of an unknown benefactor he excapes from prison and is running from the police and the Highlanders. Charlie cannot remember what transpired duiring his lost year. He wonders if he really is a murderer and a terrorist. How can he prove his innocence and who is really behind all this? Was he framed, as his friends say, or did he really do these terrible things? Charlie returns to his home town, holing up in a vacant house called the “Ghost Mansion”. He teams up with his friends Rick, Josh, Milner and his girlfriend Beth to discover the truth about the murder he can’t remember and who is behind the Highlanders, a terrorist group. The author keeps you turning pages as you eagerly anticipate answers to these questions and to see if (and how) Charlie will evade the police and the Highlanders. The book is well written and interesting, and ends on a cliffhanger.

Overall, this is an exciting mystery novel that keeps the reader interested in the outcome partially due to the first person perspective and partially due to the constant chase that Charlie finds himself in. A fun book for mystery readers. If you are new to this series, you must read the first book of the series to see what transpired in Charlie’s life to bring him to the situation he finds himself in at the start of this book, book 2 in the series. Charlie’s story continues in Book 3 – The Truth of the Matter.


Mary Asher, the Golden Reviewer, is a founding book blogger for BookGateway.com. She describes herself as “An 80 year old avid reader reviews the newest in Christian fiction and non-fiction with a sprinkle of the secular on top.”.

This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.

The Male Factor by Shaunti Feldhahn

Like Shaunti Feldhahn’s previous works, the Male Factor is commentary based on surveys. I was introduced to Feldhahn’s work through For Men Only: A Straightforward Guide to the Inner Lives of Women, which I found to be very helpful in understanding my wife and her needs. And though I am a man interested in women, I also read For Women Only: What You Need to Know about the Inner Lives of Men to see how accurate I found the survey information to be. I found that Feldhahn was spot on and the surveys incredibly insightful. Now with this book, we get the same insightful information but based on surveys focused on the work environment instead of the home.

As a man in the business world I found that the survey was right inline with how I see the workplace and / or how I know that my male peers do. I imagine that if a woman was to read this book and implement some of the suggestions that they would immediately find their male peers much easier to work with and her job much more enjoyable. (In the same way, I look forward to the upcoming partner book, which will focus on how males can function better at work with females.) Interestingly, this book also sheds light on some of the weaknesses in the way that men function, and while reading I found that I could benefit from changing my worldview as well.

Another solid book that I recommend to all business people, male or female.


Scott Asher is the founder and administrator of BookGateway.com. Along with his contributions to BookGateway, he reviews for the commercial site BuddyHollywood.com. His personal blog is AshertopiA – a land flowing with milk and honey… and a lot of sticky people where he cartoons and writes on anything he finds funny and Christianity, which sometimes overlap.

This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.

The Rose Conspiracy by Craig Parshall

J.D. Blackstone is perfect. Well, except that he can’t sleep. He has multiple degrees, knows everything, is in great shape, rich, a professor and lawyer. He drives a Maserati convertible. He has an attractive partner at the law firm and soon after the start of the book he has an attractive and very interested defendant. If this book was somehow filmed in black and white J.D. couldn’t have been more stereotyped.

The damsel in distress. The forgetful professor of religion (he forgets when he dropped off his dry cleaning. Really?) The tough P.I. who can get any information you need with just a few calls to his contacts. Everyone in this book is a stereotype! And yet, I found that I enjoyed the book.

This crime drama is fast paced, detailed and fun. The Booth diary and the Freemasons make for a fun setting for this mystery. Are we ever very surprised? Not really. But that’s something we can say of nearly every crime / courtroom show on TV yet we watch those.

The Rose Conspiracy is an enjoyable diversion that keeps the reader interested throughout.


Scott Asher is the founder and administrator of BookGateway.com. Along with his contributions to BookGateway, he reviews for the commercial site BuddyHollywood.com. His personal blog is AshertopiA – a land flowing with milk and honey… and a lot of sticky people where he cartoons and writes on anything he finds funny and Christianity, which sometimes overlap.

This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.

Angels by Dr. David Jeremiah

Dr. David Jeremiah says that the angel craze “peaked in the 90s” (p14) so the question of why this book was written is a justified one; there must be a pressing reason to release another book on the subject. What I found was that there really isn’t a pressing need other than the author’s desire to publish his opinion for a new generation. This is not to say that this is a bad thing. Many times a topic may have been done before, and even better, but a new generation may read this newer version and be introduced for the first time to the topic. Angels is a book like that.

I found the book most helpful when I considered it a resource rather than a standard non-fiction treatise. Chapters like, “Showing Us How to Worship,” “The Angels and Us: How Much Alike,” and “What Angels Are” are great resources for those with questions or putting together a sermon or study. The chapters are Biblically based with scripture and also references to some of the previous works on the subject.

The book is an easy to read, interesting study of angels for a new generation. I recommend it to those who have an interest in angels either for themselves or for someone that they know that may have unorthodox notions.


Scott Asher is the founder and administrator of BookGateway.com. Along with his contributions to BookGateway, he reviews for the commercial site BuddyHollywood.com. His personal blog is AshertopiA – a land flowing with milk and honey… and a lot of sticky people where he cartoons and writes on anything he finds funny and Christianity, which sometimes overlap.

This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.

Rediscovering God in America by Newt Gingrich

Newt Gingrich, former Speaker of the House of Representatives, takes us on a walking tour of the nation’s capitol – Washington, DC. The touch begins with The National Archives, Washington Monument, the Memorials of Jefferson, Lincoln, Vietnam Veterans, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the Capitol Building, Supreme Court, Library of Congress, Ronald Reagan Building, The White House, World War II Memorial, and last but now least, Arlington Cemetery and the grave of President Kennedy with the eternal flame. Gingrich give a small dissertation of the history of each and the trials and tribulations encountered in the building of these historical buildings.

This book, in part, is a history lesson of America. Gingrich clearly describes our founding father’s faith in God. From our first president, George Washington through George Bush II, God has played a mayor role in decisions made by these men, Washington at Valley Forge, Roosevelt’s “fire side chats”, Eisenhower’s prayer on the beaches of Normandy on D-day, Kennedy’s famous speech -“ask not what you country can do for you, but what you can do for your country”.

Our country is founded on the principle that “all men are created equal with certain unalienable rights…” The Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and Bill of Rights all stress the importance of the invisible hand of Almighty God. The novel is not written as political, but spiritual. Gingrich points out that our founding fathers knew that power came from God and that a nation cannot survive without God. Faith of our presidents and their devotion to God is clearly depicted in their speech3es, scriptures carved in and on all the monuments and buildings that make up our nation’s capital. He also points out that our founding founders established our nation to be a nation “under God”.

The secular Left’s relentless effort to drive God out of America is succeeding at an alarming rate. The Supreme Court ruled we can no longer say “under God” in the Pledge of Allegiance. The writer points out that we are allowing five people to completely change the structure of America.

The book is not intended to be political, acknowledge any particular religion, but is spiritual in context. Ir clearly warns us that we must stand up for God and our believes or lose our rights as a nation under God.

Callista Gingrich’s photography throughout the novel is outstanding.

I am reminded of Jefferson’s immortal words in the Declaration of Independence that all ” are men are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights…” and the inescapable truth that freedom is strictly from God’s grace. Don’t let it slip away.

Good read – will renew your faith in God. Gingrich did an excellent job.


Mary Asher, the Golden Reviewer, is a founding book blogger for BookGateway.com. She describes herself as “An 80 year old avid reader reviews the newest in Christian fiction and non-fiction with a sprinkle of the secular on top.”.

This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.

Primal by Mark Batterson

Mark Batterson through his book Primal is calling for a reformation. Starting from the viewpoint that believes that Christianity is not what it is supposed to be, Batterson works through what he believes the most raw, purest form of Christianity should look like. Primal exegetes Mark 30, “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your Strength” by redefining what those characteristics should look like to modern readers. The result is a call to renewed compassion, wonder, curiosity and energy. Each of the four sections of Primal go in depth into each of these redefined – or properly defined – characteristics and calls the reader to become what Jesus was asking us to be.

Even though I consider myself to be well read and well versed in the so-called “It” pastors of my generation, I had never heard of Batterson till Primal until Multnomah sent me this book as a review copy. If his previous books are as convicting as this one then I count that a huge loss on my part! Primal is amazing. By far the best book of 2009. The combination of calls to compassion and energy with curiosity and wonder hit home for me in a way that other books didn’t. Bell’s book, Jesus Wants to Save Christians, from last year, for instance, is a call to a reformed Christianity that is concerned about renewed compassion in the church, but is lacking Primal’s calls for curiosity and wonder at God’s creation. Batterson message fits with other authors I enjoy, like Bell, Miller and Driscoll but goes deeper than I’ve experienced before. I cannot recommend this enough.


Scott Asher is the founder and administrator of BookGateway.com. Along with his contributions to BookGateway, he reviews for the commercial site BuddyHollywood.com. His personal blog is AshertopiA – a land flowing with milk and honey… and a lot of sticky people where he cartoons and writes on anything he finds funny and Christianity, which sometimes overlap.

This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.

40 Loaves by C.D. Baker

There are so many devotionals available that most of the time I feel I’d rather not try to wade through them to find the one that would fit me. In fact, I can’t remember the last time I read through a devotional at all. I know it’s been years. Till now.

C. D. Baker’s 40 Loaves is different. Very different. How about topics like, “Why are Christians so hard for me to like?” and “Why am I afraid to read my Bible?” When Water Brook sent me this as a review copy I had only one word with which to respond: awesome!

I loved reading through one man’s struggles and finding the answers that worked for him. I found that not all of his answers worked for me, but that’s fine, because the process of working my way through tough questions about faith, love, the Bible, God, anger, frustration and so on are what grows me. A devotional that moves me along the path God has for me was just what I needed, and 40 Loaves hit the spot.

I recommend this book for anyone who is struggling with so-called deep questions about faith and doubt, any one who also asks questions like, “Why do I only pray in emergencies.” An honest book that turns into bite sized devotions the struggles and faith of the author. This isn’t some preachy, everything will turn out right devotional. This is real.


Scott Asher is the founder and administrator of BookGateway.com. Along with his contributions to BookGateway, he reviews for the commercial site BuddyHollywood.com. His personal blog is AshertopiA – a land flowing with milk and honey… and a lot of sticky people where he cartoons and writes on anything he finds funny and Christianity, which sometimes overlap.

This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.

The Devil’s Kiss by Sarwat Chadda

The Templars have fallen on hard times in this young adult horror / fantasy novel by first time novelist Sarwat Chadda. Hunted down by the church and demonic forces over several centuries, only a small group of Templars remain to hold back the darkness. Residing in modern London, Billi SanGreal, the reluctant teenage daughter of the current Head Master of the Templars, Arthur SanGreal, is the newest member of the knighthood. Things take a turn for the worse – possibly Armageddon worse – when one of the Templars accidentally draws the attention of the Angel of Death. What follows is a predictable young adult fantasy with an ending that the reader will see far in advance.

Though predictable in plot, the characters are interesting and the take on the genre is compelling. For secular fans of the genre, this book is worth purchasing and foretells a promising future for Chadda. But for Christian readers the book signifies something more, and less desirable. < This book is the unfortunate result of the popularity of modern fantasy set in real world locales that mix myth, legend and religion into an unholy concoction resulting in the dumbing down of the three complex ingredients. When religion, which most of the world recognizes as real - not fantasy - is mixed with and then placed on the same level as myth or fantasy it becomes equivalent to fantasy, something that faithful readers of all religions should be concerned about. Targeting these books at young adults further complicates the issue as young faithful readers receive a message mixing myth, legends and reality in a way that can make it hard to distinguish between them. In a society that is increasingly Biblically illiterate this spells trouble. To be clear: I have no issue with fantasy. In fact, it is my favorite genre. Fantasy realms like that of Harry Potter, for instance, are set in a fictionalized real world but diverge from reality when it comes to sacred religion. This is vastly preferable as faithful readers can enjoy books like Harry Potter without worry that the author will pit the fantasies of that world against the realities of this one. Because of the equivocation of myth and religion in the world of the Devils Kiss, I do not recommend this book to faithful readers. Secular readers may enjoy a generic, although entertaining young adult fantasy.


Scott Asher is the founder and administrator of BookGateway.com. Along with his contributions to BookGateway, he reviews for the commercial site BuddyHollywood.com. His personal blog is AshertopiA – a land flowing with milk and honey… and a lot of sticky people where he cartoons and writes on anything he finds funny and Christianity, which sometimes overlap.

This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.

Fool-Proofing Your Life by Jan Silvious

Jan Silvious is a good friend and co-host with Kay Arthur with Precept’s Ministry. She’s an accomplished speaker and author. With credentials like this one would think she wouldn’t be published as a gift / budget book, but she is with Fool-Proofing Your Life. Priced at $6.99 (suggested) the book sports colorful if generic artwork on the cover and paper one step better than newspaper quality. If Silvious isn’t a name you recognize it is entirely likely that this book would be overlooked by most buyers. And that is the shame of it.

Fool-Proofing Your Life deals with something we all deal with in our over-medicated, over-indulgent culture: crazy people. I’m not talking about certifiably crazy, I’m talking about the people in our lives who drive us crazy with their actions. Or as the author and the Bible call them, “fools.”

Each of the three Parts, Is there a fool in your life?, Relating to your fool, and Wising up, include sub-sections like Think About It, where pointed questions guide the reader in the right direction through self discovery, Go to God About It and Go to the Bible About It, which both move the reader through prayer and scripture to come through the section with a Biblical view of how to deal with their reaction to the fools in their lives. Chapter 5 alone is worth the (small) price of the book with its’ succint definitions of the types of fools the reader may encounter and how to deal with them.

Well written and full of wisdom this book may not look like much but is hard to pass up at this price point.


Scott Asher is the founder and administrator of BookGateway.com. Along with his contributions to BookGateway, he reviews for the commercial site BuddyHollywood.com. His personal blog is AshertopiA – a land flowing with milk and honey… and a lot of sticky people where he cartoons and writes on anything he finds funny and Christianity, which sometimes overlap.

This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.

Between Sunday’s by Karen Kingsbury


In Between Sunday’s, Karen Kingsbury takes you into the world of the NFL, specifically the San Francisco 49ers. While the players are fictional, the stadiums and games are come across as accurate and genuine. The novel mainly focuses on three players. Derrick Anderson, an older, seasoned quarterback who comes to the 49ers to mentor and encourage the other players; Aaron Hill, a younger quarterback with several seasons under his belt, and Jay Ryder, a rookie punter and wannabe quarterback.

This is Derrick’s last season and he wants desperatly to win another championship ring to fulfill a promise he made. He already has two rings, but needs a third for a reason only he and his wife know. Derrick is a family man, deeply rooted in his faith, living his life by God’s grace.

Aaron is an arrogrant playboy, king of the hill, living only for the moment and the adoration of the fans and media, with no time for God. Aaron has a couple championship rings and thinks that winning this season would be great, but it’s not something he is overly concerned about. After all, he has his whole life ahead of him to win Super Bowls, right?

Jay is young and a little shy, this being his first season in the NFL. He wants to fit in with the team and is awe struck by Derrick and Aaron. He has some faith, but is not completely committed.

San Francisco has a large contigent of foster kids. Megan Gunn volunteers at the Youth Center as well. She is a single foster mom to Cory. Amy, Cory’s mother, had been a close friend to Megan before she died tragically. Cory is a big fan of the 49ers. Derrick is a very compassionate person and tries to reach out to the kids. In the off season, he hosts pizza parties at a Youth Center. Derrick gives away five game tickets each week at the pizza party. Cory wants desperately to win a ticket and attend a game because Cory has a secret – he believes he is the son of one of the 49er players. Megan, of course, doesn’t believe him, attributing his belief to the fact that he so wants a father. She thinks this is just his fantasy and tries to discourage him, but Cory insists his mother told him and his mother did not lie.

Kingsbury takes you through the hopes, dreams, injuries, disappointments and trials of the coach and his players in the NFL. Will they make it to the Super Bowl, and if so, what are their chances of a win? The novel clearly points out that we are not defined by what we do on Sunday, but what we do Monday through Saturday. Between Sundays is a novel for all ages, and especially NFL and 49ers fans.


Note: In real life, Alex Smith, the current 49er quarterback founded the Alex Smith Foundation for foster children. His foundation provides provides support, funding, and a chance at a fuller life.